Toms Creek

Stream Category: B

Gear:

  • Dry Flies: BWO, Adams, Pheasant Tail, Attractors, and Terrestrials (Hoppers)
  • Nymphs : Zebra, Pheasant Tail, Prince, Hares Ear, Blood Worms and Soft Hackles
  • Streamers: Minnow Patterns, Wooly Buggers, and Leach Patterns
  • Rod: 7’-10’
  • Waders: Yes
  • Net: Yes
  • Polarized fishing sunglasses

Casting: Back, Side, and Roll

IMG_1123

About:

Toms Creek is an interesting freestone stream that flows through the heart of Blacksburg to the New River at Whitethorne. Unlike most of the mountain streams that you will find in the New River Valley area this stream flows through farmland resembling more of a spring fed stream. Because a majority of the land that Toms Creek flows through is private property the state of Virginia only stocks the tail end sections; stocking starts just north of the where Toms Creek joins with Poverty Creek going to its end at the New River. While I feel at home fishing the narrow mountain sections of Toms Creek fishing the areas that flow through the farm fields are what makes Toms Creek so enjoyable. There is nothing in this world that brings me more adrenaline than those seconds right after a large trout smashes a hopper, those seconds are what keeps this sport so addictive.

tc3

My usual plan of attack for Toms Creek is to start at Whitethorne and work my way towards the Poverty Creek Junction.   I will throw hoppers, streamers, and dry flies until it starts becoming more mountainous, and then I will switch to strictly nymphs. When the stream gets murky, account of rainfall, switch to flashy nymphs with hot spots and blood worms to produce trout.

tc1

Additional Notes and Precautions:

This stream is very popular for local spin fishermen, be prepared to have deal with the stream being crowded. However during the fall you can combat this pretty easily by going fishing on a Saturday when there is a home football game at Virginia Tech. Stick only to the areas that have the Virginia Stocked Trout signs unless you have permission from the land owners. There is one section that you can fish that has gated access, make sure you close the gate behind you because there are cattle in this area.

 

Directions from Blacksburg, VA:

 

Take Prices Fork Rd heading west towards Radford. Turn Right on to State Rte. 652, McCoy Road. Follow this road for 3.5 miles and turn right on to Mt. Zion Road. Toms Creek will be you cross over at the first bridge you come to. To get to the Poverty Creek Junction area follow Mt. Zion Rd 2.1 miles and turn left on to Poverty Creek Rd. Follow this road until you go over a bridge that goes over Toms Creek (there is a parking area just beyond this bridge).

4 Comments Add yours

  1. Neal Nelson says:

    Patrick,

    I have really appreciated your post and site. I am new to the area and your post are really the only source for info. I can find. Thanks.

    I was hoping you could give me some insight into the stocking game. I have fished three creeks/rivers: Roanoke, Potts, & today Toms after they have supposedly been stocked without any success. I only saw a few fish in Roanoke River after stopping at 3 spots. Potts was kinda of high but I have fished high water before with success. I didn’t even see a fish today at Toms Creek & stopped in 3 places. It was low. I feel like I am wasting gas & time & losing confidence. I came from Arkansas which was all tail water & stocked year around. I didn’t always catch fish but I knew they were there. I do not have to catch many to enjoy fishing but I would like to think I could.

    I fly fish only & 90% of the time just catch & release.

    Any info. would be appreciated.
    Neal

    Like

    1. Thanks for the comment.

      Sorry about not responding earlier, it has been a heck of a week. The way the state stocks our local creeks is definitely not adequate in comparison to how heavy these streams are fished. When I first moved to Blacksburg I honestly debated if I had any actual skill fly fishing because I was not catching anything either. Then one day I hit Big Stony on stocking day and I saw the real reason why I was having so much trouble; heavy fishing pressure. I swear the traffic behind the stocking truck (which comes from Paint Bank) would have been larger than a parade in Blacksburg. Not to mention the people already camped out at almost every hole waiting on the stocking truck. Honestly I don’t know how these people know when the state decides to stock, but it was sickening to see how many fish were stocked then taken out that day. I understand that we all pay for a license and have a right to fish when we choose, however I think that the day of stocking the creek should be shut down to allow the fish to spread and to give time for people that work to enjoy it. But anyways, back to your question, unless you fish these creeks on the day of or a few days after a stocking they are extremely difficult to fish and the chances of catching a fish over 12” is almost zero. So just keep an eye out daily on the VDGF stocking page, they post what has been stocked by 4pm every day. As far as flies, don’t waste your time dry fly fishing on these streams ( if want to dry fly go to Little Stony or Roaring Run). Instead use weighted nymphs or streamers; I only keep 5 types of nymphs (assorted colors of pheasant tail, hares ear, prince, soft hackle, and zebra midges) and wooly buggers (olive or black) anymore in my fly boxes. Just don’t get discouraged, keep trying the local streams (but maybe not Toms Creek), and don’t be afraid to go off the beaten path (there are tons of places on these streams that don’t get any pressure because people don’t want to crawl through some laurel bushes) .

      If you have any other questions just give me a shout.

      Like

  2. Seth says:

    Where exactly is the open field strip? Would love to check that part out!

    Like

    1. Seth, sorry about the long delay. but here is the google map point. Look at it on the satellite view to make sure, but you should see a swinging bridge over the stream.

      4423-4511 Mt Zion Rd
      Blacksburg, VA 24060

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s