Barbours Creek

Stream Category: B (NSF)

Wild Trout: South Prong of Barbours Creek holds native Brook

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Gear:

· Dry Flies: Adams, BWO, Terrestrials, Stimulators, Royal Wulff, and Caddis

· Nymphs : Pheasant Tail, Hares Ear, Copper John, Prince, Zebra Midge, and Soft Hackles

· Streamers: Wooly Bugger

· Rod: 7’ to 9’

· Waders: Chest

· Net: Yes

· Polarized fishing sunglasses

Casting: Back, Side, and Roll Casts

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About:

Barbours Creek is a fine stream that suffers from insufficient waters thus resulting in it being listed as NSF Virginia stream. However when the water is up and the state stocks this stream, Barbours Creek is one of the only streams that carries trophy sized brook trout. In fact brook trout is the only species of trout that the state of Virginia stocks in Barbours Creek. According to the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries website Barbours Creek had twenty two brook trout citations just in 2013-2014 season, with the largest brookie weighting in over four pounds.

The stream itself is a beautiful Virginian mountain stream. Actually I would say it is a bit more than that, it is simply breathtaking. Because of its location in the highlands of the Jefferson National Forest in Craig County, Virginia, Barbours Creek is virtually untouched by civilization. You are not going to see the all to normal stream side trash, what you are going to see is crystal water that mirrors the forest that surrounds it.

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Though Barbours Creek is a very lengthy stream that flows into Craig Creek, the state of Virginia only stocks a four mile stretch of water near the Potts Mountain Jeep Trail. Within this stretch of water prepare for many riffles and countless deep holes, with brook trout hiding in at almost every turn. Really you could park about anywhere within this stretch and catch your limit, however I suggest using the camping and parking areas that you will find. Usually by doing so you are going to find the deepest holes in Barbours Creek. If you are adventurous I suggest trying to fish the South Prong of Barbours Creek, you will find a lot of native brook trout lying in wait that have not seen heavy fishing pressure.

Additional Notes and Precautions:

Because you will be in the back country I suggest taking the proper precautions: notifying someone where you will be at and when you will be back, taking food, water, and a med kit. Also you will be in an area that is a very popular place for hunters, make sure you wear some type of blaze orange and take the proper precautions when it comes to personal protection from wild animals. You will get the occasional cell phone signal but do not count on having this throughout your day.

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Directions:

From Main Street in Blacksburg:

From Main Street going towards 460 West, turn right onto Mt Tabor Rd. Continue on Mt Tabor Rd for 10.8 miles until it merges with VA-624. Continue on VA-624 for 7.7 miles. Turn left onto VA-311 N and follow road for 10.3 miles. Turn right onto State Rte 615/Market St in New Castle and follow road for 2.8 mies. From here make a slight left onto VA-609 and continue for 2.2 miles. Turn left on to State Rte 611 and follow for 3.2 miles, by now you will see Barbours Creek on your left. Turn right onto VA-617/Barbours Creek Road continue for roughly 2.3 miles until you see the first Virginia State Stocking Sign, this sign is closely located to the Potts Creek Jeep Trail.

From I81 in Roanoke:

Take exit 141 for VA-419 toward VA-311 N/Salem/New Castle. Turn left on to VA-419 N, then turn right onto VA-311 N. Follow VA-311 N until you reach New Castle, Va. Turn right onto State Rte 615/Market St in New Castle and follow road for 2.8 mies. From here make a slight left onto VA-609 and continue for 2.2 miles. Turn left on to State Rte 611 and follow for 3.2 miles, by now you will see Barbours Creek on your left. Turn right onto VA-617/Barbours Creek Road continue for roughly 2.3 miles until you see the first Virginia State Stocking Sign, this sign is closely located to the Potts Creek Jeep Trail.

7 Comments Add yours

  1. Enjoying your reviews of Old Dominion trout streams. Although I don’t fly-fish as far south as your area of the state, I look forward to fishing the Blue Ridge streams near Charlottesville each year, with an upcoming visit around Thanksgiving. Anyway, keep up the good work here!

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    1. Thanks, I have been loving your website as well. I’m still apprehensive about using the floating pontoons, I’m super clumsy and i think i would in up in the lake.

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  2. Christian says:

    Thank you for this. I am a fisherman from the Salem area and always love chasing natives. There is little to no information I can find about where to find native brooks is roanokes surrounding areas. If you know of anymore in the Craig county area and are willing to tell if be very appreciative.

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    1. Roaring Run and Little Stoney are probably the best two in the area for natives.

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  3. Michael says:

    Outstanding information. You have great writing ability! Thanks for sharing.

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  4. Ross Vincenti says:

    Thank you, good synopsis. Visiting Roanoke next week and will give this a shot.

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  5. Ross, I would check the Virginia stocking page (https://www.dgif.virginia.gov/fishing/trout-stocking-schedule/) before heading up to Barbours Creek. If you are going for natives try Roaring Run, North Creek, or Little Stoney Creek. Hope this helps out.

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