Toccoa River-Delayed Harvest

Stream Location: Fannin County

Wild Trout: Rainbow and Brown

Stocked: Rainbow, Brook, and Brown

Other Species of Note: Smallmouth, Largemouth, Rock, and Spotted Bass

Gear:

Dry Flies: Adams, Caddis, Royal Wulff, Terrestrials 

Nymphs: Caddis Puppa, Pheasant Tail, Prince, Hares, Stone, Squirmy Wormy, Mop, and Perdigon 

Streamers: Minnows, and Wooly Buggers

Waders: Yes

Net: Yes

Wading Stick: Yes

Casting: Overhead, Tuck, Bow and Arrow, Spey, and Roll

About:

Realistically there is very little chance of me going through and telling you about the entire Toccoa River and all of the places to fish on it. It would be like giving a stream post that covers the Chattahoochee River, the South Holston River, the New River, and the James River. It would be an impossible feat unless I spent years doing the research, neglecting the other streams in the state of Georgia. I am not that bold to do that. 

What I can say about the Toccoa River is that it is a beautiful freestone stream in Northern Georgia that makes you almost feel like you are out west fishing. It is remarkably cold, with large runs, deep holes, nice rapids, and a few riffles. Caution must always be used when fishing in a river such as the Toccoa, rain fall and snow melt can make this river a very dangerous spot for anglers that are wading and people who are floating it. Also during the fall, leaves can often mask how deep a hole is, be careful not to get into a situation where you could fall into one of these holes, always carry a wading stick with you to make sure this does not happen. Also you might want to bring a change of clothing just in case.

My main focus of this stream write up is stream post will cover the Delayed Harvest section of the Toccoa River, since it is one of only five DH streams in the state of Georgia. Located in Fannin County, near the town of Blue Ridge, Ga the Toccoa DH section is an amazing piece of water that can an be accessed by angler that are wading or ones that wish to float through. Realistically you should always check the water levels of this section of water before coming here. The day I took all of these photos for this post the Toccoa was very high, but I couldn’t resist the fall foliage. In most sections it would have been almost impossible to wade that day, but a person with a boat or raft could easily float through this section. As I have said before, please be careful out on the Toccoa while fishing, watch the depth of the water, watch for people in boats, and if you are floating this section watch for those that are wading. 

As far as fishing this section one should use any type of hot spot nymphs, Pat’s stoneflies, squirmy wormies, and mop flies during the early months of the DH season. Once true winter sets in switch up to the more traditional styles of nymphs as fish get accustomed to the water (do not forget about midges). Streamers and dry flies are also a very good choice to use here. Another option, especially in high water, is to use a spey or switch rod to get further out in the stream, thus covering more water. The main thing to remember is to make sure that if you are using nymphs and streamers that you are getting down deep enough in the water column to the fish. Look for structure in the river that fish could easily hide behind, and don’t forget that fish sometimes like to be at the very end of a long run where water is not flowing so roughly. 

Once again please be careful out on the Toccoa, take the appropriate precautions, park in the designated areas. Also try not blocking boating ramps that guides and boat owners like to use to pull their boats/rafts out of ( there is at least one that I know of, you will know it once you see it).

Directions:

https://georgiawildlife.com/sites/default/files/wrd/pdf/trout/tocooaDH.pdf

EAT THE PINK

How can one explain the reason why some fly anglers get the itch to go out in very cold weather early in the morning to  cast extreme heavy flies on 12 weight rods, hoping to catch the attention of a fish that last evolved during the prehistoric times, only to come way often with nothing but a sore arm and shoulder? Muskie Madness is what it is called, it is a disease of the mind that plagues a few anglers every single year and it is insatiable. For over the past two years I have had this disease; I have driven thousands of miles, spent thousands of dollars, experienced damn near hypothermia, while slowly damaging my entire right arm and shoulder, only to get skunked every single time that I have went out to fish for these fish. This is by definition insanity! 

I should stop, no really I should stop, fishing for musky has become such an addiction that any other fishing has never compared to my obsession with musky fishing. Why has it become such an addiction to me? Why do I keep torturing myself? Why do I keep spending money on a fish that obviously I might never catch? Why, oh God, why?

Realistically I can give you a couple lame excuses; I live in the middle of Georgia where there are no musky, musky do not live in ugly places, it gives me a reason to go home to Virginia, explore the waters of North Carolina and Tennessee, and blah, blah, blah… so on and so forth. You get the drift. However, honestly, it is the pure adrenaline rush of seeing such a river monster just suddenly appear right behind your fly, it’s like they are Klingon Destroyer ships de-cloaking right behind your fly. Pure primal instincts immediately sending your body into overdrive, while your mind screams in its best 80’s action flick voice “Eat the Fly Mother Fucker!” Then just as they appear they disappear, or they take broad lunge at your fly then disappear. What ensues next can best be described as the scene out of Happy Gilmore, the one where Happy starts yelling profanities at his golf ball, breaks his golf club, and throws his golf bag into a pond. Such a good movie!

Do you know how crushing it is to have such an anticlimactic event happen to you, with that much adrenaline flowing? The best way I can describe it is if you were a man proposing to his girlfriend; to being that nervous, that sure she would say yes… only to have her say no. Or another way is watching your favorite football team playing your biggest rival team, to be in overtime, to having the game all come down to  an easy kick, only to watch the kicker miss the kick wide right. Insanity! Musky fishing is just pure, gut wrenching insanity, but I freaking love every second of it. 

On my last musky fishing trip I went with Blue Ridge Musky’s co-owner Cap. Brent Perkey, I have known Brent for years now. I have went on several trips with him, and I can tell you, without a doubt, that he knows how to fish for these beasts. He is on the James River almost every day during the Fall, Winter, and Spring guiding and/or fishing for these fish. During the past several summers he has also went to Alaska and guides for monster pike. In essence Brent knows where musky are, and he knows what they like to hit the most. Why? Well that is his job to know, he does his due diligence by being on the front lines every day, and he doesn’t disappoint.

Anyways, on my last musky fishing trip with Brent I had nine follows in one day, nine! Before we got started Brent looked at several of my flies and decided on a Pink and White T-Bone Bufford, a fly that I thought was not a very good tie. But he insisted that I use it. That fly got six muskies to follow it. By the end of the day I was manically screaming “Eat the Pink!” The other 3 follows came from one very large Chubracabra T-Bone (18 inches long) and a brown Bufford T-Bone.  

Luckily for me Brent isn’t easily offended and has quite the sense of humor, because by the end of the day I said about every curse word I knew and I was starting to invent new ones. But I wasn’t broken hearted because Brent was there to keep my spirits high after every musky follow ended badly. Even by the end of that fishless day I didn’t want to go to the closest bar and drown my sorrows with beer (even though I still did). Being with a guide that knows the risk of getting skunked while musky fishing, one that make sure his clients keep casting, and wanting to hunt for these fish is a such a blessing.

Musky… the fish of one thousand casts… the fish of ten thousands casts… wolves of the river… the bastard fish that refused to just “Eat the Pink!” Insanity? Yes! However I will keep hunting them until I catch one these prehistoric fish, afterwards I am going to have a lot of Bourbon and Beer. Maybe an ice cream, maybe I will drink some Baileys from a shoe, who knows. But I know musky will always haunt my dreams until I catch one.

If you would like to contact Brent and make a reservation with him or his partner Sam, their website is www.blueridgemusky.com, they will make sure to take care of you.

Little Amicalola Creek

Stream Location: Dawson County

Wild Trout: None that can be fished for (above the falls there are wild brook trout but there are no fishing signs up)

Stocked: Rainbow, Brook, and Brown

Other Species of Note: 

Gear:

Dry Flies: Adams, Caddis, Royal Wulff, Terrestrials 

Nymphs: Caddis Puppa, Pheasant Tail, Prince, Hares, Stone, Squirmy Wormy, Mop, and Perdigon 

Streamers: Minnows, and Wooly Buggers

Waders: No

Net: No

Wading Stick: Yes

Casting: Overhead, Tuck, Bow and Arrow, and Roll

About:

Let me start off by saying that Little Amicalola Creek is absolutely stunning. Between the massive Amicalola Falls and the beautiful paths along the stream, this creek is amazing. However this stream is such a let down. I would truly love to see this creek, or at least the section inside Amicalola Falls State Park, be turned into a special regulation catch and release area and to establish it as a wild brook trout stream. However as of right now this creek is stocked and it gets fished out very quickly. Also this creek suffers, like all creeks in Georgia, a lack of water (which could be solved by the destruction of the pond at the base of the falls). 

Ultimately because the water here is so clear, the creek doesn’t have an ample amount of water flow during the summer, and the amount of high amount of pressure this stream receives I can not recommend fishing here. It is pointless, instead go to Amicalola Creek or another creek close by. 

As far as trying to fish here, it is possible right after a stocking. Aim for the bigger holes and the pond at the base of the falls. I would use nymphs mainly, do not weight them (unless you are fishing them in the pond) and do not use any streamer patterns (except in the pond). I personally haven’t tried dry fly fishing here because it seems pointless with the amount of fish in some of the pools, however I am sure a stocker that survives a couple days in the creek would probably hit a dry fly. 

Another bummer, besides it being fished out quickly, and the amount of traffic that comes here, is that because it is a state park; you will need to buy a parking pass, rather a yearly or daily pass, in order to fish here. 

Directions:

Amicalola Creek

Stream Location: Dawson County and Dawson WMA

Special Regulations: Delayed Harvest from November 1st – May 14th

Wild Trout: Unknown; this stream is massive and has the potential for wild trout

Stocked: Rainbow, Brook, and Brown

Other Species of Note: Bass

Gear:

Dry Flies: Adams, Caddis, Royal Wulff, Terrestrials 

Nymphs: Caddis Puppa, Pheasant Tail, Prince, Hares, Stone, Squirmy Wormy, Mop, and Perdigon 

Streamers: Minnows, and Wooly Buggers

Waders: Yes

Net: Yes

Wading Stick: Yes

Casting: Overhead Tuck, Bow and Arrow, Roll, and Spey

About:

Let me first say that Amicalola Creek is massive, its really a small river that flows into the Etowah River. Now with that being said, there are literally miles of fishable water and a plethora of public access points to fish. Also Amicalola Creek is one of five Delayed Harvest Streams in the State of Georgia, but I will cover that further later in this post. 

Amicalola Creek is a stream that literally you could fish at any access point and catch fish year round, it is so big that stocked fish have miles and miles to circulate in and get away from the anglers that just want to fish where the stocking trucks dump at. As for the creek it is a freestone creek that offers very long pools, deep pockets, several undercuts, fast riffles, and very wadable waters in most areas. 

Honestly you could probably spend a lifetime wade fishing this creek and never be able to cover it all. As a Georgia fly fishermen this creek is almost a must to fish, it offers so many ways to fish it; you can easily perform roll casts, tuck casts, roll casts, and you could always spey fish here. It is just an amazing piece of water.

Now comes the Delayed Harvest Section of the stream; this section runs from County Road 192 (Steele Bridge Road) downstream to GA Hwy 53. The Delayed Harvest season runs from November 1st to May 14th. This section is just as amazing as the rest of the creek but offers some truly deep holes, use caution in this area and make sure you don’t get in over your waders. 

When it comes to fly choice the choices are endless, about everything works. However using a two nymph tandem rig is my preferred way to fish this creek, especially in the deep holes in the DH section. Also streamers are a very good choice in this water, there are several small bait fish throughout this creek and they become a prime target for trout, especially in deep holes and high water. Also it worth mentioning that anglers should not forget about midges during the winter months when fishing the DH sections, when fish are not hitting anything big they are munching on tiny midges, this can often save an angler from having a skunked day to multi fish day. 

Directions:

I am going to provide a link of a map provided by the State of Georgia for the Directions. If you have any questions just leave a comment and I will provide some better directions if needed.

https://georgiawildlife.com/sites/default/files/wrd/pdf/trout/amicaloladh.pdf

Smith Creek

Stream Location: White County

Special Regulations: Delayed Harvest from November 1st – May 14th

Wild Trout: Unknown; I have yet to try and explore above Ruby Falls

Stocked: Rainbow, Brook, and Brown

Other Species of Note:

Gear:

Dry Flies: Adams, Caddis, Royal Wulff, Terrestrials 

Nymphs: Caddis Puppa, Pheasant Tail, Prince, Hares, Stone, Squirmy Wormy, Mop, and Perdigon 

Streamers: Minnows, and Wooly Buggers

Waders: Yes

Net: Yes

Wading Stick: Yes

Casting: Overhead, Tuck, Bow and Arrow, and Roll

About:

Starting at the mouth of Ruby Falls in Unicoi State Park, then going in to Unicoi Lake, then starting again below the dam at Unicoi Lake you have Smith Creek. Smith Creek is a year round stocked stream available to all anglers, however Smith Creek doesn’t really begin at Ruby Falls, it truly begins above the falls and has the possibility to have wild brook trout in its head waters (this I haven’t explored yet). Still yet Smith Creek might be one of the prettiest streams I have encountered here in Georgia and it is one of five Delayed Harvest Streams. The Delayed Harvest season here in Georgia is from November 1st – May 14th, and the Delayed Harvest section for Smith Creek is located from the mouth of Unicoi Dam to the Unicoi State Park boundary. 

Honestly I am not being fictitious about how beautiful this stream is, it is truly an amazing freestone stream that is meticulously cleaned by the workers of the park. Also it has the best parking area that I have ever seen on a Delayed Harvest Stream, not to mention there is a set of permanent bathrooms on site. Realistically it feels like you are fishing at a resort, because technically you are. 

The Stream, like I previous said, is a freestone stream that runs the mouth of Ruby Falls down to the Lake Unicoi. This section is only stocked during the summer time, take note that most of the fish here will probably fished out by the end of October, and looks like a mountain stream slowly meandering down to the lake. But the real gem of the stream is below the dam. Here you will find a quick moving stream that has long pockets, deep holes, several undercuts, and utterly beautiful water. From what I have seen, the State of Georgia does not slack off when it comes to DH waters, Georgia puts some slabs in these waters. 

As far as fly fishing, using mop flies, squirmies, and streamers work really well during the stocked season and the early months of the DH season. However after these fish become more accustomed to the stream and its traditional meal base, fly fishermen need to switch over to more traditional flies (ie pat’s stonefly, prince nymphs, pheasant tails, hares ear, and zebra midges… especially zebra midges during the winter months, I cannot stress how important these flies are during the winter months). During the stocking season you can pretty much fine the stockers in the deeper sections or in fast runs, but during the DH season you need to cover all of the stream because of water temps and the fish being able to freely move. 

Now for the bummer part! I know, I know, there is always a bummer part. Because Smith Creek is located in Unicoi State Park, and because of the Town of Helen, Georgia this stream gets hit hard year round. There really isn’t any good time to come here where you will be alone with the stream. However even though this stream can get very crowded I still would recommend it over some of the other streams here in Georgia just on how beautiful it is. Also there is a required parking pass that all visitors must purchase; you can get a yearly pass or you can get a day pass, I would strongly recommend just getting the yearly pass because this allows you to park in any Georgia State Park. 

Directions:

Turner Creek

Stream Location: White County

Wild Trout: None

Stocked: Rainbow Tout and Brown Trout

Other Species of Note:

Gear:

Dry Flies: Adams, Caddis, Royal Wulff, Terrestrials 

Nymphs: Caddis Puppa, Pheasant Tail, Prince, Hares, Stone, Squirmy Wormy, Mop, and Perdigon 

Streamers: Minnows, and Wooly Buggers

Waders: Yes

Net: Yes

Wading Stick: Yes

Casting: Overhead Tuck, Bow and Arrow, and Roll

About:

I am seriously feeling deja vu as I write this stream write up, it really seems that Georgia has a lot of creeks are set up for spin fishermen, or for those that really just want to take some fish home with them. Turner Creek is a very, very small creek that has very limited access, if I ever find a new access point to it that is on public land I will update you readers. 

Turner creek is a spring creek that has a freestone bottom, it looks a lot like a certain spring creek in Virginia that I love to fish. However there is very limited access to this stream. I would use everything in my arsenal to hammer these fish. Keep close to banks and also fish deep in the section where water flows over a grated sections. Just be warned; there is not a lot of creek to fish and getting into this area is a bit sketchy. I wouldn’t right off this creek if you are looking for some fish to take home, again fish it deep and be very thorough.

Directions:

Chickamauga Creek

Stream Location: White County

Wild Trout: None

Stocked: Rainbow Tout

Other Species of Note:

Gear:

Dry Flies: Adams, Caddis, Royal Wulff, Terrestrials 

Nymphs: Caddis Puppa, Pheasant Tail, Prince, Hares, Stone, Squirmy Wormy, Mop, and Perdigon 

Streamers: Minnows, and Wooly Buggers

Waders: Yes

Net: Yes

Wading Stick: Yes

Casting: Overhead Tuck, Bow and Arrow, and Roll

About:

I have almost come to conclusion that the state of Georgia loves to create areas designed specially for spin fishermen and also some for fly fishermen. Chickamauga Creek has only 30 yards of access, it is literally just one large hole that someone can fish for a couple hours. I am positive that this creek gets fished out almost as soon as it gets stocked. I have spent hours looking for other spots that the state of Georgia could also stock, however my search has not yielded anything as of yet. I have even went as far as to ask a local fly shop about it and they are almost certain that this is the only area that fishing is allowed publicly. 

The stream flows straight off of a small water fall into a massive hole, one that is very deep. From there it flows down past a nice wood covered bridge, then you will see the no trespassing signs begin. 

My advice is to fish this hole using nymphs, mops, squirmies, or using a wooly bugger. The reason being is that I believe that the fish that are stocked here get hammered with about everything but a fly. Using something very buggy might produce a very productive day. I wouldn’t right off this creek if you are looking for some fish to take home, fish it deep and be very thorough.

Directions:

Crumbley Creek

Stream Location: White County

Wild Trout: None

Stocked: Rainbow Tout

Other Species of Note:

Gear:

Dry Flies: Adams, Caddis, Royal Wulff, Terrestrials 

Nymphs: Caddis Puppa, Pheasant Tail, Prince, Hares, Stone, Squirmy Wormy, Mop, and Perdigon 

Streamers: None

Waders: No

Net: No

Wading Stick: No

Casting: Tuck, Bow and Arrow, and Roll

About:

Well I finally found a place that is a spin fishermen’s dream come true, this stocked stream is very small and also very confined. You will be lucky to even be able to roll cast on this stream. Your best bet is to cast out just enough to carry your fly down the stream a bit, then using a tuck cast bring your fly or nymph back up stream to float down. 

The stream is very small and confined, as I have previously said, however the stream seems to be a very healthy freestone stream. The main problem with this stream and why it should not really be considered is that it has very little public access, not even 30 yards. Also It is very tough to fish unless you are a very skilled in fishing in very confined areas. My advice is to go to Smith Creek if you are in the area.

Directions:

Waters Creek

Stream Location: Chestatee WMA

Wild Trout: Unknown, but they are there

Stocked Unknown, however the state does stock this stream once a year

Other Species of Note:

Gear:

Dry Flies: Adams, Caddis, Royal Wulff, Terrestrials 

Nymphs: Caddis Puppa, Pheasant Tail, Prince, Hares, Stone, Squirmy Wormy, Mop, and Perdigon 

Streamers: None

Waders: Yes

Net: Yes

Wading Stick: Yes

Casting: Tuck, Overhead, and Roll

About:

Waters Creek… Bless it’s heart, it means well. That right there pretty much sums of Waters Creek, everything about it just screams I AM A TROUT STREAM, but sadly this is far from the truth. With that being said, work on Waters Creek is still on going so that it has a chance to become a wild trophy trout stream.

Waters Creek, which is a tributary to Dicks Creek, located in Lumpkin County, is a beautiful sandy/gravel bottom stream that is clean and cold. Trout Unlimited and the State of Georgia have done a lot of work on this stream, even making it one of the few streams that you can only fish on certain days of the week, signing in at the lodge located at the beginning of the stream. Honestly the possibilities are there for this stream to be completely refurbished and wild trout to flourish here, however it will cost a lot of money to get it there and to maintain it.

I have been to Waters Creek area several times on the days that fishing is not allowed on Waters Creek, the parking area for Dicks Creek is also used for Waters Creek, and I have seen fishermen coming off the trail to Waters Creek back to their vehicles, obviously the regulations are not being enforced like they are on Waters Creek sister regulated stream Dukes Creek, and anglers are going into this area at their leisure. Also I am seeing a lot of signs that the special regulations for artificial lures only on Waters Creek are also being ignored by the signs of power bait and worm containers that I see on the sides of the stream. This leads me to a highly educated guess that the locals or careless anglers that are in the know are coming to Waters Creek and fishing it out before the fish can even establish themselves.

Realistically if the State of Georgia wants to see this stream take off then they are going to have to set it up like Dukes Creek; gate it off, have Wardens on site daily, and realistically only  open it from October to May. Also they need to gate off the stream so that the fish that are stocked in Waters Creek do not swim downstream and get into Dicks Creek. If not, I see any money and restoration put into Waters Creek being wasted.

Honestly I loathe being negative about a stream, especially one that is gorgeous and has such possibilities, I really love the area that Waters Creek and Dicks Creek are in, however I promised myself years ago when I started this site to tell the truth and that’s what I am doing. As far as how to fish Waters Creek I have no clue, I have only seen one fish in the stream and I have been skunked every time I have fished this stream. The only pointers I can really give you is about the gear you take; during the summer you can easily wet wade this area, just make sure your sandals have some studs in them. During the winter: waders that come down to your hip should be fine. As far as styles of fly fishing: there is plenty of room in places to dry fly fish, in other areas I can see where nymph fishing would be prime, and also I have seen areas that streamers should work. But like I mentioned above, I honestly have no clue what will definitely work – all I can do right now is guess. If by chance I do figure out Waters Creek I will update this section immediately. Also I will update this stream as stream restoration goes forward.

***Update***

As I was going to get photos for this writeup I noticed that the stream has a lot of wild fingerlings in it. I am unsure of what type, they looked to be brook trout, so now I know this stream definitely has some wild fish in it, or some stocked fingerlings. With any hope these fish will grow up unscathed by natural predation and become big and strong. They are literally everywhere throughout the stream. Also it looks like some people have cleaned up the park tremendously. However the park still needs a lot of work and they need a Warden onsite, they only have a sign in sheet. What I did find hilarious was that someone was soo disgusted with the stream that they wrote, “What a f@#king joke of a creek GADNR,” in the guest sign in sheet.

Again I can only hope that this stream will get better as the years go by.

Directions:

Jones Creek

Stream Location: Lumpkin County (Special Regulation Water)

Wild Trout: Brown

Stocked Trout: None

Other Species of Note:

Dry Flies: Adams, Caddis, Royal Wulff, Terrestrials 

Nymphs: Caddis Puppa, Pheasant Tail, Prince, Hares, Stone, Squirmy Wormy, Mop, and Perdigon 

Streamers: Small Minnow 

Waders: Yes

Net: Yes

Wading Stick: Yes

Casting: Tuck, Overhead, and Roll

About:

If you want a stream that is very beautiful, very technical, full of waterfalls, stealthy approaches, and very cold, clean water – then Jones Creek is the creek for you. Forming out of a natural spring in the mountains, the stream slowly meanders down from its head waters, gaining faster water as it hits several waterfalls below the Jones Creek Campground. There has been a lot of restoration efforts by the State of Georgia and Trout Unlimited to make this a wonderful wild brown trout stream. However these efforts are still in the works and have not totally taken a foot hold as of yet.

Imagine a stream that has some pretty significant pools, fast runs, and a lot of structure to hide in – not to mention a large amount of gravel beds that a brown trout can spawn in, this is Jones Creek. The bad part as I have mentioned earlier, is that this stream is just in the beginning stages of restoration, it might take twenty years to see this stream grow into what it could become. So with that, don’t take what I am about to say with a grain salt, Jones Creek is not going to be a trophy stream for years to come, it is not an easy stream to fish, you must be very stealthy (I would suggest wearing camo and felt boots) using long leaders or a euro leader setup, and I definitely wouldn’t fish heavy nymphs or streamers unless the stream was very high (ie after week of rain).

The main thing an angler that comes here must realize is that this stream is meant to be a “wild brown trout” stream, brown trout are known for being very easily spooked and they love to hide in undercuts. Because of this you might not even see a trout, thinking that it is a dead stream, and you will more than likely get skunked. Jones Creek is definitely not for those anglers that are wanting to catch trophy sized brown trout… yet.

However, if you are still reading this and you still want to fish this stream because you want to get away from the hustle and bustle of the other trophy wild brown trout streams (Dukes Creek, the Chattahoochee River, or any of the other tail waters in Georgia) then you need to heed my advice. Be as sneaky as you can! Seriously; sneaky, sneaky, sneaky! Do not wear bright colored clothing, wear camo or something very drab, also I would suggest felt boots or sole less moccasins. Also take the bare minimum with you, rod, one or two fly boxes, tippet, and floatant. Realistically you will want to be able to carry everything you need in the pockets of your jeans or pants, you really don’t want to carry a bag with you when you are fishing Jones Creek. It’s all about stealth on this creek. Realistically treat Jones Creek as if you were fishing for brook trout. Be prepared to not see a fish, if you do see one be prepared to never catch it, be prepared to be skunked on a regular basis here, and if by some miracle you do catch one of the gems of this creek treasure it like it is gold!

When it comes to casting: make very few false casts, be very accurate to hit right on the edges of rocks and logs, start from the bottom of the pools and work your way up to its mouth. If you are nymph fishing: start fishing a line very close to you and work your way out from there, again its worth mention that you should use a euro nymph setup on this stream or a very buggy indicator (New Zeland Strike Indicators). As for fishing streamers, don’t! Not unless there has been a very significant rain and the creek is raging, this will be the only time that you could sneak a small streamer into this creek. Finally it is worth mentioning that if you are into Tenkara fly fishing, then this stream would be a very good stream to use a Tenkara rod on.

Directions: